Hot off the press! Mushrooms are all the hype right now


By: Dr. Stephanie Bureau, ND

As retailers, you are probably well-aware that Medicinal Mushrooms are all the rage right now. Consumers in fact, are clamoring for mushrooms to help with everything from stress, immunity and athletic performance. Health food fads come and go of course, and while some ingredients have solid, factual research supporting their mode of action and benefits to health, others are more loosely based on anecdotal data. Fortunately, Medicinal Mushrooms have a wealth of solid supportive scientific research behind them that has clearly shown that they offer a whole host of therapeutic benefits, such as bolstering the body’s stress response, immune modulation and energy production. Let’s take a closer look.

Medicinal Mushrooms 101

The medicinal use of Mushrooms has a well-established history in Traditional Chinese Medicine that dates back thousands of years, and in that time, science has identified a variety of unique bioactive compounds in fungi species, that each offer their own distinct benefits to health.

One of the key advantages of Medicinal Mushrooms is that they are among the most effective adaptogens on the market today. In a nutshell, adaptogens are substances that support the body’s ability to deal with stress.1, 2, 3 Like thermostats, adaptogens are able to “adapt” their functions according to the specific needs of the body on any given day. So, for instance, if you need a little stimulation one day, that is what they will give you. If the next day, you need a little relaxation, that is precisely what you’ll get. Health Canada, in fact, tells us that certain varieties of mushrooms have long been used in Herbal Medicine as potent adaptogens to help increase energy and bolster resistance to stress. A considerable advantage for you and your customers in the current pandemic context! Medicinal mushrooms also have powerful immunomodulating properties and so, can be used to help support the immune system (yet another advantage in current times).4

Another Key Consideration when Selecting your Mushroom blends

Research has shown that each part of the mushroom has its own distinct composition and offers its own unique medicinal properties. Indeed, it’s been established that the mycelium is rich in complex polysaccharides, polyphenols, vitamins, minerals, prebiotics and digestive enzymes, and is essential to triggering immune function. The fruiting body, on the other hand, is rich in beta-glucans with potent, scientifically demonstrated immune modulating properties.5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 As such, formulas that feature the entire mushroom provide a more complete, Full-Spectrum, Whole Food Benefits and offer your customers an optimal range of benefits. For example, Reishi mushroom is used in herbal medicine as an adaptogen to increase energy and resistance to stress in case of mental and physical fatigue related to stress,4 whereas Cordyceps is a source of fungal polysaccharides with immunomodulating properties.So, when selecting a mushroom supplement, it’s especially important to pay attention to the label to make sure you are recommending the mushroom formula that best meets each customer’s distinct needs and goals.

New Progressive Mushroom Lineup

As you may know, Progressive recently launched 3 NEW Mushroom products, helping support consumers looking for MORE for everyday stress and immunity support. The formulas all feature whole-food mushroom powders that are grown exclusively on organic, gluten-free oats. To ensure highest quality, all three Progressive Mushroom products are TRU-ID® certified to guarantee the authenticity of the ingredients listed on the label. They are sure to become your customers favourite stress and immunity support supplements very soon!

Speak to your account manager today to find out more about the New Progressive Medicinal Mushroom Lineup.

References:

1.  Sissi Wachtel-Galor, John Yuen, John A. Buswell, and Iris F. F. Benzie. Herbal Medicine: Biomolecular and Clinical Aspects. 2nd edition. Chapter 9 Ganoderma lucidum (Lingzhi or Reishi). https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK92757/

2. Katie M Love, Rebecca E Barnett, Ian Holbrook, Gerald Sonnenfeld, Hajime Fujii, Buxiang Sun, James C Peyton, William G Cheadle. A natural immune modulator attenuates stress hormone and catecholamine concentrations in polymicrobial peritonitis. J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2013 Jun;74(6):1411-8. doi: 10.1097/TA.0b013e31829215b1

3.Muszyńska, B., Grzywacz-Kisielewska, A., Kała, K., & Gdula-Argasińska, J. (2018). Anti-inflammatory properties of edible mushrooms: A review. Food Chemistry, 243, 373–381. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2017.09.149

4.Health Canada. Mushrooms Monograph. Accessed May 25, 2020 at: http://webprod.hc-sc.gc.ca/nhpid-bdipsn/atReq.do?atid=mushrooms.champignons&lang=eng

5.Muszyńska, B., Grzywacz-Kisielewska, A., Kała, K., & Gdula-Argasińska, J. (2018). Anti-inflammatory properties of edible mushrooms: A review. Food Chemistry, 243, 373–381. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2017.09.149

6.Sandrina A. Heleno, Lillian Barros, Anabela Martins, Maria João, R.P. Queiroz, Celestino Santos-Buelga, Isabel C.F.R.Ferreira. Fruiting body, spores and in vitro produced mycelium of Ganoderma lucidum from Northeast Portugal: A comparative study of the antioxidant potential of phenolic and polysaccharidic extracts. Food Research International, Volume 46, Issue 1, April 2012, Pages 135-14. doi.org/10.1016/j.foodres.2011.12.009

7. Muszyńska, B., Grzywacz-Kisielewska, A., Kała, K., & Gdula-Argasińska, J. (2018). Anti-inflammatory properties of edible mushrooms: A review. Food Chemistry, 243, 373–381. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.foodchem.2017.09.149

8. Koh J. H, Yu K. W, Suh H. J, Choi Y. M, Ahn T. S. Activation of macrophages and the intestinal immune system by an orally administered decoction from cultured mycelia of Cordyceps sinensis. BiosciBiotechnol Biochem. 2002;66:407–11.

9. Sissi Wachtel-Galor, John Yuen, John A. Buswell, and Iris F. F. Benzie. Herbal Medicine: Biomolecular and Clinical Aspects. 2nd edition. Chapter 9 Ganoderma lucidum (Lingzhi or Reishi). https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK92757/

10. Katie M Love, Rebecca E Barnett, Ian Holbrook, Gerald Sonnenfeld, Hajime Fujii, Buxiang Sun, James C Peyton, William G Cheadle. A natural immune modulator attenuates stress hormone and catecholamine concentrations in polymicrobial peritonitis. J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2013 Jun;74(6):1411-8. doi: 10.1097/TA.0b013e31829215b1

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