Gut Feelings: Coming to your (internal) senses






Contributed by: the Jamieson Wellness Academy Team.

We know the importance of gut health for digestion: if digestion isn’t working properly, we don’t access the nutrients we need to stay alive, let alone thrive. An intact gastrointestinal tract is also critical for keeping undigested food bits out of the bloodstream. When the barrier becomes porous – or the gut becomes leaky – there is a two-way flow of particles into and out of the bloodstream that can lead to immune system reactions, including inflammation.[1] Inflammation, of course, is linked with a variety of chronic conditions, including cardiovascular disease, PMS, pain, and obesity.[2], [3]But research is also pointing to gut health as a key player in aspects of our well-being that we previously may not have considered, including mood, cognition, emotion – even intuition.

The Gut-Brain Connection

The gut communicates with the brain through the enteric nervous system (ENS), also known as the gut-brain axis. Messages travel along the vagus nerve, which is the longest cranial nerve in the body and has been nicknamed the “great wandering protector.” This nerve is crucial for regulating homeostasis of body systems including gut physiology, as well as the cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, and endocrine systems.[4]

But the vagus nerve is also an important player in our visceral perception.4 Visceral perceptions include how we perceive the world through our senses (sight, hearing, touch, smell, taste); awareness of our bodies in space (so we don’t bang into walls, for example); and the perception of our internal states, which is referred to as interoception. Interoception includes body experiences such as the fullness of the bladder, bowel and stomach, as well as information from other organs including the lungs and the heart.     

By reporting on the homeostatic status of these organs, these signals in turn underlie states including anxiety, hunger, pain and thirst. These messages reach our consciousness and often instigate action from us. Physiologists often use the term ‘gut feeling’ as a colloquial term for any interoceptive sensation that guides behaviour. Hunger, for example, influences us to eat. A racing heart-beat when approaching a dark alley might encourage us to stay on a well-lit street. (Do you see how interoception could also be linked intuition?)[5],[6] The vagus nerve also plays a critical role in helping us recognize our emotions.[7]

It might surprise you to learn that between 80-90% of the chatter between the gut and the brain originates in the gut.[8] Research studies have found that signals from the vagus nerve traveling from the gut to the brain have been linked to regulating mood as well as specific types of anxiety and fear.5 On the other hand, healthy vagal tone has also been directly linked to the calming parasympathetic response that allows us to stay cool in the face of stress.5

And now the microbiome

Messages that travel along the gut-brain axis are also influenced by the microbiome. Gut bacteria and their secretions influence neurons, which regulate both gut motility and signaling to the brain.[9] Gut microbiota may also play a role in the relationship between interoceptive stimuli and cognitive processes.[10] Studies show that changes in the microbiome may impact hunger and satiety messages to the brain and could play a role in obesity.[11] Importantly, other research has shown a two-way relationship between obesity and depression.[12] In other words, the microbiome is also intimately connected with how we feel – both physically and emotionally.

To support feeling good, you want to keep the gastrointestinal tract healthy. Use probiotics daily to help to promote microbial balance. Be sure your diet includes plenty of fibre to support diversity in the microbiome and to encourage healthy bowel function. Consider using digestive enzymes with every cooked meal to add fuel to digestive fires. Remember that digestive enzymes often require vitamin and mineral partners or co-factors, so aim to consume a variety of fruits and vegetables daily. To fill nutrient gaps, use a daily multi. Bottom line: Gastrointestinal tract health has far-reaching consequences beyond digestion. But you had a gut feeling, didn’t you?

The Jamieson Wellness Academy Education team recommends Progressive Perfect Probiotics, Smart Solutions GUTsmart or the Jamieson Probiotic and Digestive lineup to help restore gut microbiome and balance. Depending on your customers needs, there is support for everyone!


[1] Bischoff, S.C., Barbara, G., Buurman, W. et al. Intestinal permeability – a new target for disease prevention and therapy. BMC Gastroenterol 14, 189 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12876-014-0189-7 4

[2] Graziottin A, Zanello PP. [Menstruation, inflammation and comorbidities: implications for woman health]. Minerva Ginecologica. 2015 Feb;67(1):21-34. Liu, Y., Alookaran, J. J., & Rhoads, J. M. (2018). Probiotics in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Disorders. Nutrients, 10(10), 1537. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101537

[3] McLoughlin, R., Berthon, B., Jensen, M., Baines, K., & Wood, L. (2017). Short-chain fatty acids, prebiotics, synbiotics, and systemic inflammation: a systematic review and meta-analysis. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition106(3), ajcn156265–. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.117.156265

[4] Browning, K., Verheijden, S., & Boeckxstaens, G. (2017). The Vagus Nerve in Appetite Regulation, Mood, and Intestinal Inflammation. Gastroenterology152(4), 730–744. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2016.10.046

[5] Kandasamy, N., Garfinkel, S., Page, L. et al. Interoceptive Ability Predicts Survival on a London Trading Floor. Sci Rep 6, 32986 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1038/srep32986

[7] Colzato, L., Sellaro, R., & Beste, C. (2017). Darwin revisited: The vagus nerve is a causal element in controlling recognition of other’s emotions. Cortex92, 95–102. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cortex.2017.03.017

[8] Breit S, Kupferberg A, Rogler G, Hasler G. Vagus Nerve as Modulator of the Brain-Gut Axis in Psychiatric and Inflammatory Disorders. Front Psychiatry. 2018;9:44. Published 2018 Mar 13. doi:10.3389/fpsyt.2018.00044 9

[9] Bastiaanssen, T., Cowan, C., Claesson, M., Dinan, T., & Cryan, J. (2019). Making Sense of … the Microbiome in Psychiatry. The International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology22(1), 37–52. https://doi.org/10.1093/ijnp/pyy067

[10] Montiel-Castro, A., González-Cervantes, R., Bravo-Ruiseco, G., & Pacheco-López, G. (2013). The microbiota-gut-brain axis: neurobehavioral correlates, health and sociality. Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience7, 70–86.

[11] Sáez-Lara, M. J., Robles-Sanchez, C., Ruiz-Ojeda, F. J., Plaza-Diaz, J., & Gil, A. (2016). Effects of Probiotics and Synbiotics on Obesity, Insulin Resistance Syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Review of Human Clinical Trials. International journal of molecular sciences17(6), 928. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms17060928

[12] Talbott, S., Talbott, J., Stephens, B., & Oddou, M. (2020). Modulation of Gut-Brain Axis Improves Microbiome, Metabolism, and Mood. Functional Foods in Health and Disease10(1), 37–. https://doi.org/10.31989/ffhd.v10i1.685


Entre la tête et les tripes : connexion intestin-cerveau

Nous connaissons tous l’importance de la santé intestinale pour la digestion : si la digestion est entravée, nous n’avons pas accès aux nutriments dont nous avons besoin pour survivre, et encore moins pour prospérer. Un système gastro-intestinal sain est également essentiel pour maintenir les aliments non digérés hors de la circulation sanguine. Lorsque la barrière devient poreuse – ou que l’intestin fuit – il y a un flux bidirectionnel de particules dans et hors du système sanguin qui peut entraîner des réactions au niveau du système immunitaire, notamment de l’inflammation.[1]  L’inflammation est associée à diverses maladies chroniques, notamment les maladies cardiovasculaires, le syndrome prémenstruel, la douleur et l’obésité. [2],[3] Mais la recherche a également démontrée que la santé intestinale joue un rôle clé dans d’autres aspects de la santé que nous n’avions pas pris en compte auparavant, notamment l’humeur, la cognition, et les émotions, voire l’intuition.

Axe intestin-cerveau

L’intestin communique avec le cerveau par le biais du système nerveux entérique (SNE), également appelé axe intestin-cerveau. Les messages voyagent le long du nerf vague, qui est le plus long nerf crânien du corps – également appelé nerf parasympathique.

Ce nerf est essentiel à la régulation de l’homéostasie des systèmes du corps, y compris la physiologie de l’intestin, ainsi que les systèmes cardiovasculaire, respiratoire, immunitaire et endocrinien.[4] Mais le nerf vague est également d’importance majeure pour notre perception viscérale.4 Les perceptions viscérales comprennent la façon dont nous percevons le monde via nos sens (vue, ouïe, toucher, odorat, goût) ; la conscience de notre corps dans l’espace (pour ne pas heurter les murs, par exemple) ; et la perception de nos états d’âme, que l’on appelle intéroception. L’intéroception

est la capacité à évaluer activité physiologique, telle que la plénitude de la vessie, des intestins et de l’estomac, ainsi que des informations provenant d’autres organes, notamment les poumons et le cœur.

En rendant compte de l’état homéostatique des organes, ces signaux informent sur des états tels que l’anxiété, la faim, la douleur et la soif. Ces messages atteignent notre conscience et nous incitent à agir. Les physiologistes utilisent souvent le terme « intuition » pour désigner toute sensation intéroceptive qui guide le comportement. La faim, par exemple, nous incite à manger. Un battement de coeur rapide à l’approche d’une ruelle sombre peut nous inciter à rester sur la rue bien éclairée. (Voyez-vous le lien entre l’intéroception et l’intuition ?).[5],[6] Le nerf vague joue également un rôle essentiel en nous aidant à reconnaître nos émotions.[7]

Vous serez peut-être surpris d’apprendre qu’entre 80 et 90 % de la communication entre l’intestin et le cerveau provient de l’intestin.[8]  Des études ont d’ailleurs démontré que les signaux émis par le nerf vague (se rendant de l’intestin au cerveau) ont un impact direct sur la régulation de l’humeur et sont associés à l’anxiété et à la peur. 5

Un bon tonus vagal est également associé à la réponse parasympathique et nous permet de maintenir notre calme face au stress.

Et bien sûr, le microbiome

Les messages qui voyagent le long de l’axe intestin-cerveau sont également influencés par le microbiome. Les bactéries intestinales et leurs sécrétions influencent les neurones, qui régulent à la fois la motilité intestinale et la signalisation au cerveau.[9] Le microbiote intestinal peut également influencer la relation entre les stimulis intéroceptifs et les processus cognitifs.[10]

Selon la recherche, des modifications du microbiome peuvent avoir un impact sur les messages de faim et de satiété qui sont envoyés au cerveau et pourraient ainsi jouer un rôle dans le développement de l’obésité.[11] D’autres recherches ont aussi démontré une relation bidirectionnelle entre l’obésité et la dépression.[12] Ainsi, il est clair que le microbiome a un impact sur ce que nous ressentons – à la fois physiquement et émotionnellement.

Une santé optimale nécessite un tractus gastro-intestinal sain. La prise quotidienne de probiotiques aide à favoriser l’équilibre microbien. De plus, une alimentation riche en fibres alimentaires aidera à promouvoir la diversité du microbiome et favorisera une bonne fonction intestinale. Considérez aussi la prise d’enzymes digestives avec tous les repas cuits pour soutenir le processus digestif davantage. N’oubliez pas que les enzymes digestives nécessitent souvent des partenaires ou des cofacteurs vitaminiques et des minéraux, alors essayez de consommer une variété de fruits et de légumes à tous les jours. Enfin, pour combler toute lacune en nutriments potentielle, prenez une bonne multi quotidienne.


[1] Bischoff, S.C., Barbara, G., Buurman, W. et al. Intestinal permeability – a new target for disease prevention and therapy. BMC Gastroenterol 14, 189 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12876-014-0189-7 4

[2] Graziottin A, Zanello PP. [Menstruation, inflammation and comorbidities: implications for woman health]. Minerva Ginecologica. 2015 Feb;67(1):21-34. Liu, Y., Alookaran, J. J., & Rhoads, J. M. (2018). Probiotics in Autoimmune and Inflammatory Disorders. Nutrients, 10(10), 1537. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10101537

[3] McLoughlin, R., Berthon, B., Jensen, M., Baines, K., & Wood, L. (2017). Short-chain fatty acids, prebiotics, synbiotics, and systemic inflammation: a systematic review and meta-analysis. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition106(3), ajcn156265–. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.117.156265

[4] Browning, K., Verheijden, S., & Boeckxstaens, G. (2017). The Vagus Nerve in Appetite Regulation, Mood, and Intestinal Inflammation. Gastroenterology152(4), 730–744. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2016.10.046

[5] Kandasamy, N., Garfinkel, S., Page, L. et al. Interoceptive Ability Predicts Survival on a London Trading Floor. Sci Rep 6, 32986 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1038/srep32986

[6] Browning, K., Verheijden, S., & Boeckxstaens, G. (2017). The Vagus Nerve in Appetite Regulation, Mood, and Intestinal Inflammation. Gastroenterology152(4), 730–744. https://doi.org/10.1053/j.gastro.2016.10.046

[7] Colzato, L., Sellaro, R., & Beste, C. (2017). Darwin revisited: The vagus nerve is a causal element in controlling recognition of other’s emotions. Cortex92, 95–102. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cortex.2017.03.017

[8] Breit S, Kupferberg A, Rogler G, Hasler G. Vagus Nerve as Modulator of the Brain-Gut Axis in Psychiatric and Inflammatory Disorders. Front Psychiatry. 2018;9:44. Published 2018 Mar 13. doi:10.3389/fpsyt.2018.00044 9

[9] Bastiaanssen, T., Cowan, C., Claesson, M., Dinan, T., & Cryan, J. (2019). Making Sense of … the Microbiome in Psychiatry. The International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology22(1), 37–52. https://doi.org/10.1093/ijnp/pyy067

[10] Montiel-Castro, A., González-Cervantes, R., Bravo-Ruiseco, G., & Pacheco-López, G. (2013). The microbiota-gut-brain axis: neurobehavioral correlates, health and sociality. Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience7, 70–86.

[11] Sáez-Lara, M. J., Robles-Sanchez, C., Ruiz-Ojeda, F. J., Plaza-Diaz, J., & Gil, A. (2016). Effects of Probiotics and Synbiotics on Obesity, Insulin Resistance Syndrome, Type 2 Diabetes and Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Review of Human Clinical Trials. International journal of molecular sciences17(6), 928. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms17060928

[12] Talbott, S., Talbott, J., Stephens, B., & Oddou, M. (2020). Modulation of Gut-Brain Axis Improves Microbiome, Metabolism, and Mood. Functional Foods in Health and Disease10(1), 37–. https://doi.org/10.31989/ffhd.v10i1.685

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *